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Education and individuals are keys to continuing success of #Kazakhstan

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Investment in our young people has been one of the guiding principles of Kazakhstan since the earliest days of independence. The Bolashak programme, set up as far back as 1993, was, for example, a powerful symbol of our new country’s confidence and belief in the power of education as well as our openness to outside ideas.

A society lacking confidence in the future would not have had the courage to send its brightest young people to be educated abroad. Kazakhstan has reaped rich rewards from the thousands of students who have returned to work here after learning at some of the world’s best universities.

At the same time, we have seen investment in our home-grown educational institutes along with the imposition of high academic standards and recruitment of top-class staff. The result is that our universities now have a fast-growing reputation and are attracting students not just from Kazakhstan but from neighbouring countries.

But as President Nursultan Nazarbayev said àn 12 April  in his much-discussed opinion Course Towards the Future: Modernization of Kazakhstan’s Identity, if education is to drive Kazakhstan’s continued success, it must also be universal. Our ambitions rest on ensuring that all our young people – indeed the entire workforce – have the skills, knowledge and qualities needed to make a positive mark on the 21st century.

The reasons are clear. We live in an era where the world of work is faster than ever. Industries will disappear or transform. Entire professions will become redundant. Giving people the ability to find a role in the modern economy and to adapt as sectors and professions change will be essential to both individual and national prosperity.

This is one of the major challenges facing all countries not just Kazakhstan. The societies which thrive economically, socially and in terms of global influence, will be those which find and put in place the right answers. It is why the investment that Kazakhstan is making in education – among the highest globally as a share of government spending – is so important.

What was also interesting was that the President saw the solution as education in its widest form. He made clear, of course, just how essential doctors and engineers were to the country’s future. But he also stressed the importance of the humanities and promised to increase support for them in our universities.

As well as those with scientific skills, we need, he said, those “who understand modernity and the future well.” His call to translate the most influential texts in this area into Kazakh for pupils to have ready access to them also underlined the roles that schools will play in building this knowledge.

Ensuring the young generation can compete globally is also, of course, behind the new emphasis given to English in schools. And it will be helped as well by the gradual switch to the Latin alphabet for the Kazakh language.

There will, the President said, be nothing sudden about this change. It will follow the evolutionary approach which has served Kazakhstan well in so many areas since independence. But he made clear that, within a decade, he wanted the change to be underway.

Along with computer literacy and knowledge of foreign languages, he put cultural openness at the heart of the Digital Kazakhstan programme. This includes an ambition for our country to be known not just for its rich natural resources and its remarkable success in the foreign policy arena but also for its cultural achievements.

He rightly pointed out the major part that Hollywood and American culture as a whole has played in growing and maintaining its influence and stature in the world. It has been a key factor in the appeal of US soft power.

No country can compete, of course, with the universal attraction of American music or films. But Kazakhstan has been perhaps too shy at promoting the achievements of its artists, entrepreneurs and scientists beyond its borders. It has perhaps too often relied instead on statistics to showcase its progress internationally.

Dry data, no matter how impressive, is not, however as powerful as human stories for communication. By identifying Kazakhs whose personal stories could help give these achievements colour and life, we can more successfully promote Kazakhstan around the world. The initiative will have another benefit. It will also provide clear role models for our own young people to emulate. By raising their ambitions, it will, in turn, create more success stories and faster progress.

EU

Horizon Europe given the go-ahead.

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"The Horizon Europe research, innovation and science programme will deliver economic recovery in Europe. But partnerships between public and private bodies must play a key part in rolling out the policy objectives of Horizon Europe". That is according to Abraham Liukang, the Huawei chief representative to the EU institutions.

Abraham Liukang, the Huawei chief representative to the EU institutions.

Abraham Liukang, the Huawei chief representative to the EU institutions.

Horizon Europe given the go-ahead.

EU Governments this week approved the legal texts that will give the formal go ahead to the new Horizon Europe programme. Negotiations will now shortly commence with the European Parliament to iron out any differences that exist between MEPS and EU governments. The bottom line is this:- legislators and key stakeholder groups alike are working towards ensuring that the Horizon Europe programme can and will commence in January 2021.

 

Partnerships – central element of Horizon Europe.

Partnerships between public and private bodies will be a key element of Horizon Europe. This is particularly the case when it comes to involving the ICT sector in Horizon Europe. There are going to be a number of hardcore ICT public private partnerships that will build the next generation of smart services and networks (SNS) in Europe. In reality, SNS will be the key vehicle that will be used to prepare Europe to introduce 6G later in this decade. There will also be a joint undertaking that will be devoted to improving the capability of Europe in the area of key digital technologies.

 

ICT – a driver for positive change.

It is impossible to de-compartmentalise or divorce the ICT sector from other parts of Horizon Europe. This is because, as a society we are now witnessing a digital transformation. Technology is now modernising the industrial, agriculture, health, education, smart city, energy and transport sectors. There is a whole ambit of research activity that is enshrined in Horizon Europe that contains a technological component. In other words, research and innovation actions weave through the whole of Horizon Europe from the sections of this programme that deal with basic science right through to the delivery of new ICT products into the marketplace.

 

International Co-operation.

Horizon Europe is an open programme. This means that research consortia are open to participation for private, public, research, educational and public bodies from all countries around the world. In fact, organisations from circa 185 countries took part in Horizon 2020 during the past seven years alone.

If one wants to develop the best products for the marketplace then one needs to co-operate with the best talent and expertise that exists within these specific fields. I welcome too the publication that was made by the European Commission today that will support the development of a common European research area (ERA). We certainly do need a higher level of mobility of researchers in an out of Europe, including from third countries. Reciprocity, transparency and openness must underpin the relationships that third countries from around the world have with the European Union on the research front.

 

ICT will deliver Economic Recovery.

International organisations such as the OECD, the European Commission, the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank all point to the economic benefits that accrue to countries from investing in basic and applied research. The EU leaders have set a target of investment into research and science at 3% GDP. This target can be achieved by fully rolling out the Horizon Europe initiative. Research, innovation and science are economic instruments.

25% of all global research @ development is carried out in Europe. This is a very strong foundation for Europe to build upon – as the EU seeks to strengthen it’s industrial sector via the use of technology.

There are many global challenges that we all must face together. Co-operation and collaboration between public and private bodies from different countries around the world is an imperative if we are to successfully and effectively tackle these grand societal challenges.

Abraham Liukang, is the chief Huawei representative to the EU institutions.

 

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coronavirus

Whistle blower exposes threats posed by Russia’s unverified Covid-19 vaccine

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Greetings, my name is Natalya Tupota. I am one of the leading researchers at the Russian State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology Vector and I feel obliged to warn the international community about the treats posed by the Covid-19 vaccine developed by my country.

It is likely that many of you have already heard the news that Russia is the first country in the world to test vaccines against the novel coronavirus. Currently, there are three scientific institutes in Russia working on the development of the vaccine: 1) Gamalei Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology (Moscow); 2) Chumakov Federal Scientific Center for Research and Development of Immune-and-Biological Products (Moscow); 3) State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology Vector (Novosibirsk). The latter, which is also my workplace, is planning to register its vaccine on October 15th this year.

In June this year, I was unwarrantedly awarded President Vladimir Putin’s honorary accolade for my work on the vaccine EpiVacCorona. Considering my direct involvement in the development of this vaccine, I refuse to accept this award, since it is evident that the vaccine will not be ready by the designated date. Everything you may have heard about the successful tests of the vaccines developed in Russia is charlatanism by the government against the Russian people!

I have conducted numerous virological studies (including practical research of the spread of diseases in different regions of Russia and the ability of different treatments to combat these diseases) and I can declare with utmost certainty that no vaccine can be developed in such a short amount of time as set by our leaders in the Kremlin.

I want to remind everyone that in the history of mankind the fastest vaccine developed was the vaccine for mumps, which happened in the sixties and took four whole years! And now our government (along with other governments around the world) is telling us that a vaccine against a considerably more complicated disease has been developed in mere six months! This is nothing short of absurd, and I am saying this as an experienced specialist who was tasked with completing this impossible mission. I am tired of lying and servicing the regime. What is more, I am absolutely convinced that none of the scientific institutes in Russia will be able to develop an effective vaccine in the nearest 3-5 years.

First, Russia’s virology sphere is severely underfunded. The salary of a junior researcher at Vector reaches just 20,000 rubles (224 euro). This is barely enough to pay utility bills and buy the cheapest available food. And exactly because of the minuscule salaries, the industry is unable to attract new employees or keep the old ones. This has resulted in a catastrophic drop in the level of scientific research in the country since the collapse of the USSR.

Second, our research center, just like others in Russia, is gripped by rampant corruption. Ten years ago, the future of our center was uncertain due to the incompetent leadership by doctor Drozdov. Now, a decade later, nothing has really changed. Our leadership, in the person of Rinat Maksyutov, continues to squander our budget for their personal benefit, while the salaries of employees remain pathetically low. What is more, in order to receive government funding, the leadership is willing to lie about Vector’s achievements, as was the case with the development of the vaccine against Covid-19.

Third, our leadership and our scientists have been ordered to keep their mouths shut and pretend that the process of developing of the vaccine went without any incidents. Make no mistake, these too are utter lies. As I already mentioned, in June this year several employees at Vector (including myself) received honorary accolades for developing the vaccine. Even our center’s chauffeur received a medal, and his only duty is to transport our corrupt leadership to and from work. The intention behind these medals and monetary incentives was to keep us silent and show us that it is in our interests to cooperate with the regime.

It is immediately evident that Moscow’s officials care for the vaccine exclusively because of its propaganda and nationalistic significance. They are completely indifferent towards the fact that an unfinished and ineffective vaccine will lead to grave consequences if it was to be distributed among the public. Consider the following: people who receive this fabricated vaccine will cease observing protective measures and will put the entire nation at risk of a new outbreak. Even more, an untested vaccine can weaken a person’s organism, and this in conjunction with Covid-19 can lead to the individual’s death.

Considering the aforementioned, I urge everyone – people around the world and my compatriots – to distrust Moscow’s lies regarding the effectiveness of the vaccine. Do not put your life and the lives of others at risk and please continue following the prescribed safety measures, because there will not be a miracle cure to this disease any time soon.

Senior researcher at the State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology Vector Tatyana Leonidovna Tupota.

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Brexit

Brexit - EU starts infringement process for UK's failure to act in good faith

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As anticipated, the European Commission today (1 October) has sent the United Kingdom a letter of formal notice for breaching its obligations under the Withdrawal Agreement. This marks the beginning of a formal infringement process against the United Kingdom. It has one month to reply to today's letter.

The Withdrawal Agreement states that the European Union and the United Kingdom must take all appropriate measures to ensure the fulfilment of the obligations under the Agreement (Article 5). Both parties are bound by the obligation to cooperate in good faith in carrying out the tasks stemming from the Withdrawal Agreement and must refrain from any measures which could jeopardise the attainment of those objectives.

The UK government tabled the UK Internal Market Bill on 9 September the Commission consider this a  flagrant violation of the Protocol on Ireland Northern Ireland, as it would allow the UK authorities to disregard the legal effect of the Protocol's substantive provisions. Representatives of the UK government have acknowledged this violation, stating that its purpose was to allow it to depart in a permanent way from the obligations stemming from the Protocol.

The UK government has failed to withdraw the contentious parts of the Bill, despite requests by the European Union. By doing so, the UK has breached its obligation to act in good faith, as set out in Article 5 of the Withdrawal Agreement.
Next steps

The UK has until the end of this month to submit its observations to the letter of formal notice. After examining these observations, or if no observations have been submitted, the Commission may, if appropriate, decide to issue a Reasoned Opinion.

Background

The Withdrawal Agreement was ratified by both the EU and the UK. It entered into force on 1 February 2020 and has legal effects under international law.

Following the publication by the UK government of the draft ‘United Kingdom Internal Market Bill' on 9 September 2020, Vice-President Maroš Šefčovič called for an extraordinary meeting of the EU-UK Joint Committee to request the UK government to elaborate on its intentions and to respond to the EU's serious concerns. The meeting took place in London on 10 September between Michael Gove, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, and Vice-President Maroš Šefčovič.

At the meeting, Vice-President Maroš Šefčovič stated that if the Bill were to be adopted, it would constitute an extremely serious violation of the Withdrawal Agreement and of international law. He called on the UK government to withdraw these measures from the draft Bill in the shortest time possible and in any case by the end of the month of September.

At the third ordinary meeting of the Joint Committee on 28 September 2020, Vice-President Maroš Šefčovič again called on the UK government to withdraw the contentious measures from the bill. The UK government on this occasion confirmed its intention to go ahead with the draft legislation.

The Withdrawal Agreement provides that during the transition period, the Court of Justice of the European Union has jurisdiction and the Commission has the powers conferred upon it by Union law in relation to the United Kingdom, also as regards the interpretation and application of that Agreement.

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