Connect with us

Denmark

Danish Prime Minister #Rasmussen: 'Future of EU depends on how it solves today’s challenges'

Published

on

Debate with the Prime Minister of Denmark, Lars Løkke Rasmussen, on the Future of Europe Danish Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen debated the future of Europe with MEPs© European Union 2018 - EP 

Danish Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen debated the future of Europe with MEPs and EU Commission Vice-President Valdis Dombrovskis on Wednesday (28 November).

Lars Løkke Rasmussen praised the EU for bringing peace to the continent. He went on to say that, the EU must listen to what the people of Europe want the EU to be in the future.

The EU needs to do more

Mr. Rasmussen said the future of the EU depends on whether it is able to solve the greatest challenges of today and outlined four areas where he believed the EU should play a strong role in future:

Migration: “We could all do a better job of explaining to the citizens what the EU and the member states have already achieved. For instance, there has been a 95% drop in migrant arrivals since the crisis of 2015.”

Fight against climate change: “If we set ambitious goals for the green transition at European level, we will motivate our own industry to be front-runners. To the benefit of all of us in Europe.”

The single market: “Expanding and modernizing the Single Market is key. It must be digitally competitive. Data must flow freely.”

Free trade: “It is our duty to safeguard free trade – even under historic pressure.”

Learn from Brexit

“We must respect the choice of the British people, but we also need to learn from this choice. For forty years, Britons were told how European cooperation was holding them back. When in fact, Brexit has revealed how European cooperation was solving problems that the Brits now have to deal with on their own: securing open borders, frictionless trade, peace and security. In Britain, the government perhaps forgot to convey what we have achieved together.”

Denmark belongs in the EU

Prime Minister Rasmussen said that Denmark belongs in the EU and that Danes are not reluctant Europeans.

“The share of people supporting the EU is larger in Denmark than in most other European countries! And the share of Danes who believe their voice is heard at the European level ranks second among twenty-eight Member States”, he said.

He believes this is because Denmark has had an open debate about the EU in the last 30 years, which has given Danes a more pragmatic view of the EU. The EU is a good deal and the EU should continue to come up with down-to-earth solutions to present-day problems, he said.

You can watch the plenary debate via EP Live and EbS+.

Speakers’ interventions are available by clicking on the links below.

President Antonio TAJANI, introduction

Lars Løkke RASMUSSEN, Danish Prime Minister

Valdis DOMBROVSKIS, Vice-President of the European Commission

Manfred WEBER (EPP, DE)

Jeppe KOFOD (S&D, DK)

Anders Primdahl VISTISEN (ECR, DK)

Guy VERHOFSTADT (ALDE, BE)

Philippe LAMBERTS (Greens/EFA, BE)

Dennis de JONG (GUE/NGL, NL)

Laura AGEA (EFDD, IT)

Nicolas BAY (ENF, FR)

Lars Løkke RASMUSSEN, Danish Prime Minister, response

More information 

coronavirus

Commission approves Cohesion Policy funds redirection to mitigate the impact of #Coronavirus in Denmark and near the Hungarian-Slovakian border

Published

on

The European Commission has approved the modifications of the ‘Innovation and Sustainable Growth in Businesses' programme in Denmark and of the Interreg Hungary-Slovakia programme. Thanks to the modifications, the two programmes will allocate additional resources to address the effects of the coronavirus crisis.

Cohesion and Reforms Commissioner Elisa Ferreira (pictured) said: “From the Danube river to the North Sea swift action under Cohesion policy is mobilising resources and people to fight the pandemic. There is no time to waste and I look forward to seeing more programmes modified according to current needs in the following weeks.” The modification of the Interreg Slovakia-Hungary programme will increase temporarily the EU co-financing rate to 100% of eligible expenditure, thus helping beneficiaries overcome liquidity scarcity in the implementation of their projects.

In Denmark, the modification of the 'Innovation and Sustainable Growth in Businesses' programme will extend financing to companies affected by the coronavirus pandemic to restructure and consolidate themselves. The modification will also improve cooperation between large companies and SMEs in green transition, thus helping the later overcome difficulties caused by the pandemic in maintaining the green transition and implementing green business models. The Coronavirus Response Investment Initiative packages, proposed by the Commission in March and April this year, made the modification of the two programmes possible. So far, 18 member states have adjusted their Cohesion policy programmes to redirect funding towards fighting the consequences of the coronavirus pandemic.

Continue Reading

coronavirus

Commission approves €148 million Danish scheme to compensate companies for damages still suffered due to #Coronavirus outbreak

Published

on

The European Commission has approved under EU state aid rules a DKK 1.1 billion (approximately €148 million) Danish scheme to compensate damages suffered by companies in the tourism and travel-related sectors. The scheme will be open to companies active in those sectors and whose activities are still affected by previous border closure and travel restrictions that have now been lifted, or by the remaining border and travel related measures implemented by the Danish government to limit the spread of the virus.

Under the scheme, such companies, which have a documented decline in turnover of more than 35% because of the coronavirus outbreak, will be entitled to compensation for the damage they suffer. This will be applicable for the period between 8 July to 31 August 2020 compared to a reference period before the coronavirus outbreak. In particular, they will receive a compensation in the form of a partial or full coverage of the fixed costs that they continue to bear.

The Danish authorities foresee several levels of compensation according to the level of turnover decline. The maximum aid amount per company is DKK 60m (approximately €8m). The Danish authorities will carry out ex-post checks to ensure that the compensation does not exceed the actual damage suffered. The public support in excess of the actual damage received by the beneficiaries will have to be paid back to the Danish state. The Commission found that the scheme is in line with Article 107(2)(b) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), which enables the Commission to approve state aid measures granted by member states to compensate specific companies or specific sectors for the damages directly caused by exceptional occurrences, such as the coronavirus outbreak.

The Commission found that, in spite of the progressive reopening of the Danish society, the scheme will compensate damages that are still directly linked to the coronavirus outbreak and the subsequent measures adopted by the Danish government. It also found that the measure is proportionate, as the envisaged compensation does not exceed what is necessary to make good the damage. The Commission therefore concluded that the scheme is in line with EU state aid rules. More information on the actions taken by the Commission to address the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic can be found here.

The non-confidential version of the decision will be made available under the case number SA.57932 in the state aid register on the Commission's competition website once any confidentiality issues have been resolved.

Continue Reading

coronavirus

Commission approves €148 million Danish scheme to compensate companies for damages still suffered due to #Coronavirus outbreak

Published

on

The European Commission has approved under EU state aid rules a DKK 1.1 billion (approximately €148 million) Danish scheme to compensate damages suffered by companies whose activities are still subject to the restrictive measures implemented by the Danish Government to limit the spread of the coronavirus, while the rest of the economy is progressively re-opening.

The scheme will be open to companies that are still forbidden to carry out their activities and to suppliers of goods and services for events that have been cancelled, because of these measures. Under the scheme, such companies, which have a documented decline in turnover of more than 35% because of the coronavirus outbreak, will be entitled to compensation for the damage they suffer. This will be applicable for the period between 8 July to 31 August 2020 compared to a reference period before the coronavirus outbreak.

In particular, they will receive a compensation in the form of a partial or full coverage of the fixed costs that they continue to bear. The Danish authorities foresee several levels of compensation according to the level of turnover decline. The maximum aid amount per company is DKK 60m (approximately €8m). The Danish authorities will carry out ex-post checks to ensure that the compensation does not exceed the actual damage suffered. The public support in excess of the actual damage received by the beneficiaries will have to be paid back to the Danish state. The Commission found that the scheme is in line with Article 107(2)(b) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), which enables the Commission to approve state aid measures granted by member states to compensate specific companies or specific sectors for the damages directly caused by exceptional occurrences, such as the coronavirus outbreak.

The Commission found that, in spite of the reopening of the Danish society, the scheme will compensate damages that are still directly linked to the coronavirus outbreak. It also found that the measure is proportionate, as the envisaged compensation does not exceed what is necessary to make good the damage. The Commission therefore concluded that the scheme is in line with EU state aid rules. More information on the actions taken by the Commission to address the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic can be found here. The non-confidential version of the decision will be made available under the case number SA.57930 in the state aid register on the Commission's competition website once any confidentiality issues have been resolved.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Facebook

Twitter

Trending